Hackers

    Apple’s Bug Bounty Program : Hacker’s Getting Paid

    How does one of the largest and most innovative companies in history prevent cyber attacks and data hacks? They hire hackers to hack them. That’s right, Apple pays up to $1 million to friendly hackers who can find and report vulnerabilities within their operating systems. Recently, Apple announced that it will open its Bug Bounty program to anyone to report bugs, not just hackers who have previously signed up and been approved. 

     

    Apple’s head of security engineering Ivan Krstic says is that this is a major win not only for iOS hackers and jailbreakers, but also for users—and ultimately even for Apple. The new bug bounties directly compete with the secondary market for iOS flaws, which has been booming in the last few years. 

     

    In 2015, liability broker Zerodium revealed that will pay $1 million for a chain of bugs that allowed hackers to break into the iPhone remotely. Ever since, the cost of bug bounties has soared. Zerodium’s highest payout is now $2 million, and Crowdfense offering up to $3 million.

    So how do you become a bug bounty for Apple? We’ll break it down for you.

     

    What is the Apple Security Bounty?

    As part of Apple’s devotion to information security, the company is willing to compensate researchers who discover and share critical issues and the methods they used to find them. Apple make it a priority to fix these issues in order to best protect their customers against a similar attack. Apple offers public recognition for those who submit valid reports and will match donations of the bounty payment to qualifying charities.

    See the Apple Security Bounty Terms and Conditions Here

    Who is Eligible to be a Bug Bounty?

     

    In order to qualify to be an Apple Bug Bounty, the vulnerability you discover must appear on the latest publicly available versions of iOS, iPadOS, macOS, tvOS, or watchOS with a standard configuration. The eligibility rules are intended to protect customers until an update is readily available. This also ensures that Apple can confirm reports and create necessary updates, and properly reward those doing original research. 

    Apple Bug Bounties requirements:

    • Be the first party to report the issue to Apple Product Security.
    • Provide a clear report, which includes a working exploit. 
    • Not disclose the issue publicly before Apple releases the security advisory for the report. 

    Issues that are unknown to Apple and are unique to designated developer betas and public betas, can earn a 50% bonus payment. 

    Qualifying issues include:

    • Security issues introduced in certain designated developer beta or public beta releases, as noted in their release notes. Not all developer or public betas are eligible for this additional bonus.
    • Regressions of previously resolved issues, including those with published advisories, that have been reintroduced in certain designated developer beta or public beta release, as noted in their release notes.

    How Does the Bounty Program Payout?

     

    The amount paid for each bounty is decided by the level of access attained by the reported issue. For reference, a maximum payout amount is set for each category. The exact payment amounts are determined after Apple reviews the submission. 

    Here is a complete list of example payouts for Apple’s Bounty Program

    The purpose of the Apple Bug Bounty Program is to protect consumers through understanding both data exposures and the way they were utilized. In order to receive confirmation and payment from the program, a full detailed report must be submitted to Apple’s Security Team.  

     

    According to the tech giant, a complete report includes:

    • A detailed description of the issues being reported.
    • Any prerequisites and steps to get the system to an impacted state.
    • A reasonably reliable exploit for the issue being reported.
    • Enough information for Apple to be able to reasonably reproduce the issue. 

     

    Keep in mind that Apple is particularly interested in issues that:

    • Affect multiple platforms.
    • Impact the latest publicly available hardware and software.
    • Are unique to newly added features or code in designated developer betas or public betas.
    • Impact sensitive components.

    Learn more about reporting bugs to Apple here

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