Yes, you read that correctly, cyber insurance is a real thing and it does exactly what is says. No, cyber insurance can’t defend your business from a cyber-attack, but it can keep your business afloat with secure financial support should a data security incident happen. Most organizations operate their business and reach out to potential customers via social media and internet-based transactions. Unfortunately, those modes of communication also serve as opportunities to cyber warfare. The odds are not in your favor, as cyberattacks are likely to occur and have the potential to cause serious losses for organizations both large and small. As part of a risk management plan, organizations regularly must decide which risks to avoid, accept, control or transfer. Transferring risk is where cyber insurance will pay massive dividends.

     

    What is Cyber Insurance?

    By definition, a cyber insurance policy, also known as cyber risk insurance (CRI) or cyber liability insurance coverage (CLIC), is meant to help an organization alleviate the risk of a cyber-related security breach by offsetting the costs involved with the recovery. Cyber insurance started making waves in 2005, with the total value of premiums projected to reach $7.5 billion by 2020. According to audit and assurance consultants PwC, about 33% of U.S. companies currently hold a cyber insurance policy. Clearly companies are feeling the need for cyber insurance, but what exactly does it cover? Dependent on the policy, cyber insurance covers expenses related to the policy holder as well as any claims made by third party casualties. 

    Below are some common reimbursable expenses:

    • Forensic Investigation: A forensics investigation is needed to establish what occurred, the best way to repair damage caused and how to prevent a similar security breach from happening again. This may include coordination with law enforcement and the FBI.
    • Any Business Losses Incurred: A typical policy may contain similar items that are covered by an errors & omissions policy, as well as financial losses experienced by network downtime, business disruption, data loss recovery, and reputation repair.
    • Privacy and Notification Services: This involves mandatory data breach notifications to customers and involved parties, and credit monitoring for customers whose information was or may have been violated.
    • Lawsuits and Extortion Coverage: This includes legal expenses related to the release of confidential information and intellectual property, legal settlements, and regulatory fines. This may also include the costs associated from a ransomware extortion.

    Like anything in the IT world, cyber insurance is continuously changing and growing. Cyber risks change often, and organizations have a tendency to avoid reporting the true effect of security breaches in order to prevent negative publicity. Because of this, policy underwriters have limited data on which to define the financial impact of attacks.

    How do cyber insurance underwriters determine your coverage?

     

    As any insurance company does, cyber insurance underwriters want to see that an organization has taken upon itself to assess its weaknesses to cyberattacks. This cyber risk profile should also show how the company and follows best practices by facilitating defenses and controls to protect against potential attacks. Employee education in the form of security awareness, especially for phishing and social engineering, should also be part of the organization’s security protection plan. 

    Cyber-attacks against all enterprises have been increasing over the years. Small businesses tend to take on the mindset that they’re too small to be worth the effort of an attack. Quite the contrary though, as Symantec found that over 30% of phishing attacks in 2015 were launched against businesses with under 250 employees. Symantec’s 2016 Internet Security Threat Report indicated that 43% of all attacks in 2015 were targeted at small businesses.

    You can download the Symantec’s 2016 Internet Security Threat Report here

    The Centre for Strategic and International Studies estimates that the annual costs to the global economy from cybercrime was between $375 billion and $575 billion, with the average cost of a data breach costing larger companies over $3 million per incident. Every organization is different and therefore must decide whether they’re willing to risk that amount of money, or if cyber insurance is necessary to cover the costs for what they potentially could sustain.

    As stated earlier in the article, cyber insurance covers first-party losses and third-party claims, whereas general liability insurance only covers property damage. Sony is a great example of when cyber insurance comes in handy. Sony was caught in the 2011 PlayStation hacker breach, with costs reaching $171M. Those costs could have been offset by cyber insurance had the company made certain that it was covered prior.

    The cost of cyber insurance coverage and premiums are based on an organization’s industry, type of service they provided, they’re probability of data risks and exposures, policies, and annual gross revenue. Every business is very different so it best to consult with your policy provider when seeking more information about cyber-insurance.

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